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Outlook Object Model Page

iconbig-folder.gif White Papers
  The Outlook 98 Object Model Graphics By Randy Byrne
The Microsoft Outlook 97 Automation Server Programming Model
By Randy Byrne
Microsoft Outlook Objects
from the Microsoft Office 97/Visual Basic Programmer's Guide
ICONBIG-FOLDER.GIF Object Model Maps
  Outlook Object Model Extended View Courtesy of Randy Byrne
Outlook Object Model Main View
Courtesy of Randy Byrne
Outlook Object Model Legend
Courtesy of Randy Byrne
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  Download Visio version of Outlook 2000 Object Model Map (542k)
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Download Encapsulated Postscript version of Object Model Map
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Outlook Item Objects

Outlook items are represented by the fundamental objects in the Outlook object model. These objects represent mail messages, appointments or meetings, meeting requests, tasks, task requests, contacts, journal entries, posts, mail delivery reports, remote mail items, and notes. The following table describes the objects that represent Outlook items.

  Object Description
icon-folder.gif AppointmentItem Represents an appointment in the Calendar folder. An AppointmentItem object can represent either a one-time or recurring meeting or appointment. An appointment becomes a meeting when the MeetingStatus property is set to olMeeting and one or more resources (either personnel, in the form of required or optional attendees, or physical resources, such as a conference room) are designated. These actions result in the creation of a MeetingRequestItem object.
icon-folder.gif ContactItem Represents a contact in a Contacts folder. A contact can represent any person with whom you have any personal or professional contact.
icon-folder.gif JournalItem Represents a journal entry in a Journal folder. A journal entry represents a record of all Outlook-moderated transactions for any given period of time.
icon-folder.gif MailItem Represents a mail message in the Inbox folder or another mail folder. The MailItem object is the default item object and, to some extent, the basic element of Outlook. In addition to the MailItem object, Outlook also has a parallel PostItem object that has all of the characteristics of the mail message, differing only in that it's posted (written directly to a folder) rather than sent (mailed to a recipient), and it has two subordinate objects - RemoteItem and ReportItem objects - that are subsets of the mail message used to handle remote mail items and mail transport system reports, respectively.
ICON-FOLDER.gif MeetingRequestItem Represents a change to the recipient's Calendar folder, initiated either by another party or as a result of a group action. Unlike with other Outlook objects, you cannot create a MeetingRequestItem object or find an existing one in the Items collection. This object is created automatically when you set the MeetingStatus property of an AppointmentItem object to olMeeting and send it to one or more users.

To return the AppointmentItem object associated with a MeetingRequestItem object and work directly with the AppointmentItem object to respond to the request, use the GetAssociatedAppointment method.

ICON-FOLDER.gif NoteItem Represents a note (an annotation attached to a document) in a Notes folder.
icon-folder.gif PostItem Represents a post in a public folder that other users can browse. This object is similar to the MailItem object, differing only in that it's posted (saved) directly to the target public folder, not sent (mailed) to a recipient. You use the Post method, which is analogous to the Send method for the MailItem object, to save the post to the target public folder instead of mailing it.
ICON-FOLDER.gif RemoteItem Represents a remote item in the Inbox folder or another mail folder. This object is similar to the MailItem object, but it contains only the Subject, Received, Date, Time, Sender, and Size properties and the first 256 characters of the body of the message. You use it to give someone who's connecting in remote mode enough information to decide whether or not to download the corresponding mail message.
ICON-FOLDER.gif ReportItem Represents a mail-delivery report in the Inbox folder or another mail folder. This object is similar to the MailItem object, and it contains a report (usually the nondelivery report) or error message from the mail transport system.
ICON-FOLDER.gif TaskItem Represents a task (an assigned, delegated, or self-imposed task to be performed within a specified time frame) in a Tasks folder. Like appointments or meetings, tasks can be delegated. Tasks are delegated when you assign them to one or more delegates, using the Assign method.
ICON-FOLDER.gif TaskRequestItem Represents a change to the recipient's task list, initiated either by another party or as a result of a group assignment. Unlike with other Outlook objects, you cannot create a TaskRequestItem object or find an existing one in the Items collection. It's created automatically when you apply the Assign method to a TaskItem object to assign (delegate) the associated task to another user.

To return the TaskRequestItem object and work directly with the TaskItem object to respond to the request, use the GetAssociatedTask method.

The following table provides a quick summary of Outlook item objects and their default MAPIFolder containers. Note that the MeetingRequestItem, OfficeDocumentItem, RemoteItem, ReportItem, and TaskRequestItem objects cannot be created programmatically. MeetingRequestItem and TaskRequestItem are related to their associated AppointmentItem and TaskItem objects through the GetAssociatedAppointment and GetAssociatedTask methods.

  Object Name Message Class Default Folder Createable by Automation
ICON-FOLDER.gif AppointmentItem IPM.Appointment Calendar Yes
ICON-FOLDER.gif ContactItem IPM.Contact Contacts Yes
ICON-FOLDER.gif JournalItem IPM.Activity Journal Yes
ICON-FOLDER.gif MailItem IPM.Note Inbox Yes
ICON-FOLDER.gif MeetingRequestItem IPM.Schedule.Meeting.Request

Note: Can vary upon response such as

IPM.Schedule.Meeting.Resp.Pos
-- Or --
IPM.Schedule.Meeting.Resp.Neg

Inbox No
ICON-FOLDER.gif NoteItem IPM.StickyNote Notes Yes
ICON-FOLDER.gif OfficeDocumentItem

Note: OfficeDocumentItem is a hidden class in msoutl8.olb

IPM.Document.[ClassID]

Example:

IPM.Document.Office.Binder.8.My Form

N/A

Usually in public folders

Only if a custom form has been created.
ICON-FOLDER.gif PostItem IPM.Post N/A

Usually in public folders

Yes
ICON-FOLDER.gif RemoteItem IPM.Remote Inbox No
ICON-FOLDER.gif ReportItem IPM.Report Inbox No
ICON-FOLDER.gif TaskItem IPM.Task Tasks Yes
ICON-FOLDER.gif TaskRequestItem IPM.TaskRequest

Note: Can vary upon response such as

IPM.TaskRequest.Accept
-- Or --
IPM.TaskRequest.Decline

Inbox No

 


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Copyright Stephen Bryant 2008