Become a Columnist Microsoft Exchange Site Microsoft Support SiteMSDN Exchange Site

   

Subscribe to OutlookExchange
Anderson Patricio
Ann Mc Donough
Bob Spurzem
Brian Veal
Catherine Creary
Cherry Beado
Colin Janssen
Collins Timothy Mutesaria
Drew Nicholson
Fred Volking
Glen Scales
Goran Husman
Guy Thomas
Henrik Walther
Jason Sherry
Jayme Bowers
John Young
Joyce Tang
Justin Braun
Konstantin Zheludev
Kristina Waters
Kuang Zhang
Mahmoud Magdy
Martin Tuip
Michael Dong
Michele Deo
Mitch Tulloch
Nicolas Blank
Pavel Nagaev
Ragnar Harper
Ricardo Silva
Richard Wakeman
Russ Iuliano
Santhosh Hanumanthappa
Steve Bryant
Steve Craig
Todd Walker
Tracey J. Rosenblath
 
   

Debunking the top 5 Myths of Cross -Forest Exchange Migrations

Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Page 5

Exchange Cross-Forest migrations are not as impossible, expensive or complex as you may think. If you are considering merging an Exchange 2003 or Exchange 207 organization into another organization, you should know that it can be done and you can do it.

Cross organizational moves are complex and on my last large cross-org project we had nearly 100 Exchange 2003/2007 servers and over thirty locations with multiple SMTP paths. Moreover, we were dealing with two separate AD forests with absolutely no automated directory synchronization. Even with these challenges plus WAN link migrations we established a process to successfully migrate roughly 600 people in a six hour window with minimal personnel and an exceptionally low failure rate.  If you do the math you will see that we built capability to migrate 2400 a day or 16,800 people per week.  Since we are not running four shifts a day, seven days a week I have a few moments to talk about how can do it too.

As you read this, you will notice that I have included code samples, a few tips and some overall ideas to enforce by conviction that this can be done without expensive tools and to illustrate my points. You should not take this article as a complete migration guide but as a confidence builder.  There are far more technical strategies that are better described somewhere else such as sizing, migration throughput, error handling, WAN moves, server centralization, scheduling and the overall technical aspects of the scripting and process.  I have tried however to give you enough information so you can understand how manageable this process really is.

So let’s set the stage. You are tasked with planning the migration of thousands of Exchange 2003 or Exchange 2007 users from one company/organization to another. You have trusts in place and accounts in each Forest with rights and you have read very little documentation that would suggest you can accomplish this on your own. Moreover, you have a quote for $500,000 worth of migration software and have no idea how you will maintain your budget or if the software is even worth it.

Debunking the top 5 Myths of Cross -Forest Exchange Migrations

Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Page 5

Disclaimer: Your use of the information contained in these pages is at your sole risk. All information on these pages is provided "as is", without any warranty, whether express or implied, of its accuracy, completeness, fitness for a particular purpose, title or non-infringement, and none of the third-party products or information mentioned in the work are authored, recommended, supported or guaranteed by Stephen Bryant or Pro Exchange. OutlookExchange.Com, Stephen Bryant and Pro Exchange shall not be liable for any damages you may sustain by using this information, whether direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, even if it has been advised of the possibility of such damages.

Copyright Stephen Bryant 2008